Cookbooks for busy people: Delicious recipes with less time, more taste


Rush-hour traffic is officially back and so is the pressure to figure out weeknight dinners on the fly.

But all need not be lost to takeout defaults from the time before the pandemic.

Why We Rooted This

Eating well doesn’t have to mean spending hours in the kitchen. With a soupçon of inspiration and some clever shortcuts, busy families can look forward to mealtimes.

We’ve rounded up a collection of newly released cookbooks focused on helping you return to life in the fast lane with simple cooking hacks.

You might need to think beyond the everyday and seek out ingredients like grapeseed oil, garam masala, fresh ginger, and turmeric. But the fresh restart in the kitchen will be worth the effort.

Gone are the days of hours at home during the pandemic in which legions of people discovered the joys of making sourdough rounds. Rush-hour traffic is officially back and so is the pressure to figure out weeknight dinners on the fly. But all need not be lost to takeout defaults from the Before Times. Here is a roundup of newly released cookbooks focused on helping you return to life in the fast lane with simple cooking hacks. You might need to think beyond the everyday and seek out ingredients like grapeseed oil, garam masala, fresh ginger, and turmeric. But the fresh restart in the kitchen will be worth the effort.

Creative riffs on dinner classics

If you have a steady rotation of pasta, tacos, burgers, and meatballs in your house for weeknight meals, Australian cookbook author Donna Hay has some tricks to liven up the routine. In “The Fast Five,” Hay offers five riffs on each dinner classic. For example, settle a jeweled spoonful of caramelized balsamic onion onto a nest of spaghetti; fill warm flour tortillas with spiced pork and pineapple and top with feta and thinly sliced ​​green chili. Amp up burger night with kimchi beef patties finished with spicy mayo. And don’t settle for ordinary fries with that: Try crunchy potato rosti, salt-and-vinegar smashed potatoes, or herbed hash browns. Hay offers plenty of vegetable-first dishes and delectable flourless desserts without saying “vegetarian” or “gluten-free.”

Why We Rooted This

Eating well doesn’t have to mean spending hours in the kitchen. With a soupçon of inspiration and some clever shortcuts, busy families can look forward to mealtimes.

The food styling and photography is so gorgeous in “The Fast Five” that even reluctant cooks will want to venture outside their comfort zones. (If you can make your dishes look this appealing, no one at your dinner table should opt for a peanut butter and jelly sandwich instead.) For those who like to watch short recipe videos, QR codes are sprinkled throughout the cookbook that take readers to YouTube. In 90 seconds or less, Hay smiles her way through the demonstrations – from her stylish kitchen – with just the right touch to make featured dishes look easy and fast to make.

Menu plans for busy families

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